A virus made us do it …

Are you one of the many who during lockdown has wondered what the future may bring? Do you have a clear vision of what is personally meaningful and how you will change your life once the pandemic ends? 

Depending on your point of view lives will change either for the better or poorer.

I’ve thought a lot about what should change and here follow my thoughts on possible future events?

Government has learned a huge lesson and that is when a crisis looms act immediately. 

If businesses prepare for events, disasters and business continuity, why is it the government had no pandemic strategy. The government needs an effective strategy tried and tested at least once a year. Perfect preparation prevents poor results.

The UK needs to reduce its dependence on international supply chains and be ready and capable of producing what we need when we need it. Self-sufficiency.

There is a contamination risk stockpiling PPE in enormous warehouses, rendering the material unusable. As part of a pandemic strategy, the government requires a continually updated register of businesses that could shift production in a matter of days to keep the UK supplied with the PPE equipment. 

When the government negotiates BREXIT, there is much to consider, such as our diminished skills base. We need a comprehensive state-funded education program to train engineers, plumbers, electricians, construction experts, agriculturalists and many more. We don’t need a constant stream of graduates with non-degrees.

Britain is open for business allowed foreign competitors to buy many of the UK’s biggest household names (ICI, Cadbury’s, Boots, Pilkington Glass) and later move operations abroad, denying the exchequer billions in lost revenue. Smaller UK manufacturers closed as there was a cheaper version somewhere in the world. 

While protecting companies from foreign intervention is not government policy, we need to rebuild our industrial base to lessen our dependence on markets outside the UK. If not, what happens if we need immediate access to vital goods and discover we can’t purchase any because of global demand?

People and businesses will demand cash to save their businesses, although many were on the verge of collapse. The government must focus on what will thrive and benefit the UK economy. 

 Not only will the NHS receive more cash, but also the Police and education. I suggest the NHS needs reform because, without it, the entire organisation becomes a financial vacuum. 

Pollution levels have dropped. Step outside and look at the blue sky. How fresh is the air? Also, I live below the flight paths to Heathrow and Luton, and there are no visible vapour trails in the sky. 

 Now we have a feel for a cleaner world, what are we going to do about it?

We could start with substantial investment in developing electric cars and renewable resources. If we plan to buy electric vehicles, don’t forget the investment needed to design and build the infrastructure required to charge up all those automobiles. The casualties would be the oil-producing countries who would lose vital revenue. Let’s not forget the government would lose billions in tax on fuel sales. Going green will be great for the planet, but the government will raise taxes. Talking of which…

… I foresee the government hiking PAYE and corporation tax by up to +-7% to claw back the money it spent during the pandemic. There may be very little hiding room for corporations who have evaded paying their ‘fair share’ since 2008. However, when raising taxation, the government treads a thin line. Tax is a sensitive issue and will not please many Tories, although I can’t see Labour having a problem with such actions. 

As for Future holidays, it will be a staycation. I recommend a fortnight in the West Country. The airline industry may take years to recover, meaning fewer and more expensive seats owing to high profile failures (As I write this, I hear British Airways is making 12000 staff redundant).

The Office Culture

Many businesses allowed their staff to work from home. It would not surprise me if CEOs and Directors had discussed with HR that possibility in the past, but didn’t allow it for productivity reasons. By now, I’m sure many CEO’s, jobsworths, and bosses have realised their business can operate and not suffer without the staff at desks. 

Could home working become the norm?

Canny CEOs could slash company costs and decentralise their London operations to either satellite offices or branches. Doing so will give the CEO access to more applicants who wouldn’t move to London. It will be a significant benefit to Employees who rise and shine, have breakfast, and sit at a desk in their home, or maybe work closer to home on a short commute. 

Although it would be an immense change, it would not surprise me if the company bosses a few years down the line sought to cut salaries as staff no longer travel into work? 

On a personal note, by not travelling to London I’d save the following every week:

  1. train fares (Oyster £75.50)
  2. driving to Amersham parking (30 miles round journey; 5 X 6miles)
  3. parking (£36.00)
  4. lunch and coffees (£60.00; 2 X Coffees and lunch of £6 per day)

I acknowledge that not everybody can work from home. Employees of the NHS, emergency services, hospitality, retail and transport services will always be in the ‘office’. However, with trains and buses carrying fewer commuters, there will be more room available. Tourists will find it easier to use the London Underground to visit tourist attractions.

House Prices in London: 

If large companies decentralise their operations away from London, or any major city, house prices would drop. Who wants to live in London when the same well-paid opportunities are available outside London in locations with higher standards of living.

So, here follow a few final thoughts.

  1. If fewer people move to London, could it solve the question of affordable housing?
  2. Less congestion on the roadways and motorways means less damage to the roads and fewer accidents,
  3. with lower pollution levels, the NHS will see a decline in patients with respiratory problems.

The above are my views, and there are many more I could add. No doubt readers will point out their thoughts. I believe change is coming, like it or not. Much will depend on how we, as citizens of the UK, decide we want to move with the changes. 

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